Category Archive: Vaginal Laxity

Sep 06

Pelvic Organ Prolapse Surgery and Graft Complications 1950-present

Vaginal prolapse surgery with synthetic and non-synthetic graft material – Concerns about the use of graft material, particularly Prolene mesh, continue to mount after the most recent FDA warning on mesh in vaginal surgery.  These diligent authors from Michigan, Texas, Massachussetts, Washington State, New Mexico and Israel combed the international medical literature in all languages from …

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Aug 29

Female sexual function and vaginal surgery

Vaginal Prolapse Surgery, Vaginal Contour and Female Sexual Function This is another manuscript I reviewed for the Journal of Sexual Medicine, published by colleagues from The Mayo Clinic in the International Urogynecology Journal July 2011 issue. These authors looked carefully at the possibility of change in vaginal contour resulting from pelvic organ prolapse surgery with regards to female …

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Jun 30

Bulging Rectum: Rectocele Facts

Understanding Rectocele, Levatorplasty and Site-specific Rectocele surgery techniques You may be unacquainted with the term “rectocele,” but for almost 19% of women, the condition is all too familiar! In a normal female pelvis, the rectum rests behind the vagina. The two are separated by a thin wall of fibrous tissue called fascia. When the fascia …

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May 31

Kegel Exercise: The Facts

KEGEL EXERCISE: THE FACTS If you have a vagina and you’re old enough to vote, then Kegel Exercise belongs in your feminine fitness daily routine. Before you dive into pelvic fitness, it’s important to know what Kegel muscles actually DO. Kegels—or the levator ani muscles—wrap around a woman’s most important parts: her bladder, vagina, and rectum. …

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May 17

Dropped Bladder: Cystocele Facts

DROPPED BLADDER: CYSTOCELE FACTS At birth, a female’s bladder rests in front of her vagina and just behind the pubic bone. The bladder and vagina are separated by connective tissue called the vesicovaginal fascia. This fascia is anchored to each hip bone by tendons known as the arcus tendineus fascia pelvis. Vesicovaginal connective tissue is NOT particularly …

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Jan 24

Cesarean on Demand Does Not Eliminate Risk of Prolapse

Worldwide, “cesarean on demand” continues to increase. In the hopes of avoiding pelvic floor damage associated with birthing, some women have bought into the the trend for elective cesarean before onset of labor. Called “cesarean on demand” because patients demand it in the absence of a maternal or fetal indication, it’s the obstetric equivalent of …

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Nov 29

Kidogo Kidogo, fixing uterine prolapse in an incubator of extremis called the DRC

It’s not easy being a girl. I’m  here in DRC (Democratic Republic of Congo) where I and my American colleagues usually help the Panzi Hospital gyn and fistula surgeons fix fistulas and figure out ways to deal with less than perfect fistula repair results or how best to care for the “unfixables” – women with …

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Nov 25

The Step-Sisters of Fistula – Minimally Invasive Uterine Resuspension- Hysteropexy C’est Arrive au DR Congo.

NOV 23, 2010 (c) L Romanzi 2010 The Step-Sisters of Fistula – Minimally Invasive Uterine Resuspension- Hysteropexy C’est Arrive au DR Congo. It is difficult to express how impressed I am during each and every Harvard Humanitarian Initiative mission (www.hhi.harvard.edu) by the  skilled, motivated, and wise  pelvic floor – fistula surgeons at Panzi Hospital in Bukavu, …

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Oct 27

Ask Dr. R: 32 year old new mother with perineal damage, fecal incontinence and sexual pain

Hi Dr. R., I was wondering if you could help me.  I’m 32, I delivered my first child after 2 years of trying (1 year with fert. treatments); suffered a 4th degree tear.  I have a very thin perineal wall left, my repair has broken down & I’m having issues with fecal incont.  I have …

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Jul 04

Dr R Talks About Prolapse, Part 1

(C) Lauri Romanzi, 2010 Pelvic organ prolapse, the medical term for vaginal bulges caused by damage to the connective tissues supporting the organs above and around the vagina (the uterus, bladder, rectum and vaginal opening), is a silent epidemic affecting women worldwide. Common terms include dropped bladder, dropped uterus, rectocele and vaginal laxity. Recent estimates …

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